Amputee Coalition Fact Sheet

Resources for Older Adults and their Caregivers

Web Development Fact Sheet

Updated: 10/2015 –
Are you looking for information on services and resources and don’t know where to begin? Knowing how to locate community and educational resources is an invaluable tool as a caregiver or an older adult with limb loss. This fact sheet will outline general community resources and educational Web sites for frequently requested resources.

Amputee Coalition Fact Sheet

Survival Guide for Caregivers: De-stressing to Stay Healthy

Kevin Manuel Fact Sheet

Published 08/2015 –
Providing care to an individual that you love can be an opportunity to treasure. It is important to note that you must care for yourself as well in order to provide a good quality of care to your loved one. This fact sheet will explore ways to help you manage your stress. Make note of how you might fit these de-stressing activities into your life. Think of activities that you enjoy and how you might fit them in as well.

Caregivers Can Make a Difference

Web Development inMotion

Volume 21, Issue 6 November/December 2011 –
by John Peter Seaman, CP, CTP –
As a caregiver to a new amputee, you should not underestimate the value you can provide as your husband, wife, family member or friend adjusts to performing activities of daily living (ADLs) with or without the assistance of a prosthesis.

Challenges and Rewards of Caregiving

Web Development inMotion

Volume 20, Issue 2 March/April 2010 –
by Scott McNutt –
In addition to her regular job, Joann, a 48-year-old Californian, figures she spends 20 hours a week helping her mother: running errands, making sure her mother takes her medications, helping her get around, cleaning up her place and other chores of daily life. She hasn’t been keeping track of how much money she spends on her mother’s needs, but she suspects it runs into the thousands of dollars. And while caring for her mother has given Joann a sense of satisfaction, being able to give back to the woman she owes so much to, she isn’t sure how long she can keep up this pace. She suspects the cold she came down with last week may have been caused by stress as much as by a virus. Also, she’d like to go back to school to finish her degree in graphic design, so she could bring in more money, but between her job and her caregiving responsibilities, where is the time? Besides, finding reliable, affordable caregiving assistance isn’t easy.

When Our Roles Change From Caregiver to Receiver

Web Development inMotion

Volume 19 · Issue 1 · January/February 2009 –
by Tammie Higginbotham, Amputee Coalition Regional Representativeand Volunteer Outreach Team member –
After I got married, I opted to stay at home for my stepson. During those years I ended up using my professional caregiving skills to help my family through many ordeals. I took care of my husband after our motorcycle accident. I took care of my aging grandmother. I took care of my stepmother during her cancer treatments. And for 6 years I was my father’s caregiver after he was diagnosed with congestive heart failure and then lung cancer during the last year of his life.

The Observant Caregiver

Web Development inMotion

Volume 18 · Issue 3 · April 2008 –
Being a caregiver means being available to assist and care for someone who needs help. Many people, including seniors, need help with daily living activities, but they don’t want to be completely dependent. An observant caregiver can help someone feel more independent by observing exactly what that person needs help with and finding a solution. Even if there seem to be many problems at once, it’s best to focus on fixing one thing at a time.

First a Partner, Then a Caregiver

Web Development inMotion

Volume 18 · Issue 1 · January/February 2006 –
by Alison W. Henderson, MS, and Rhonda M. Williams, PhD –
Many individuals commit to love their partner/spouse “in sickness and in health.” However, major illness or injury, such as amputation, can tax even the strongest relationships. No matter what the cause, limb loss can affect mobility, vocational opportunities, recreational activities, comfort level, and mood.