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message from the editor AA man’s home is his castle; however, many seniors and people with disabilities may feel like prisoners in their own home if they can’t move about like they could before. According to a recent housing survey, 83 percent of Americans age 45 and older would like to live in their current homes as long as possible. However, almost one in four expect that they or someone in their family will have trouble getting around that home within the next five years. A growing trend to address this problem is the concept of universal design, which is increasing in popularity for several reasons (see page 32). First, universal design promotes independence and prevents accidents. Research shows that home modifications could prevent 30 to 50 percent of all home accidents. Second, it looks good. People with disabilities don’t feel like they’re settling for a personal nursing home. Finally, we all want more comfort and convenience in our homes, whether we have a disability or not. People live longer than they used to, which means that more of us are, or will be, living with disabilities. The traditional home that serves you well now, while you’re healthy, won’t be so user-friendly when you’re older or if you lose a hand or a leg. The ability to drive is equally important to our sense of independence. Driving means much more than simply getting from point A to point B. When we lose our ability or license to drive, we lose a significant part of our life and identity. And personal mobility is more than just an individual issue. When transportation doesn’t work, other factors – our employment, education, healthcare and economy – are affected as well. But limb loss doesn’t mean the end of the road. With the proper equipment, education and training, vehicle modifications can provide a multitude of options (see page 20). Home and vehicle modifications can open doors of opportunity to individuals who feel like they have lost their independence – you can still get there from here. Bill Dupes, Senior Editor BE AN INFORMED READER Editorial content (articles, news items, columns, editorials, etc.) in inMotion often contain healthcare information. As an informed reader, you should never make a decision about managing or treating your condition without consulting your own clinicians: They know you best. Sometimes, in our interviews with people who are amputees, the person being interviewed will say something about his or her personal experience that may not be entirely consistent with standard practice. In these cases, we print what the person said because we think it gives readers insight into that individual’s experience that we believe will resonate with others. But: We urge you to always check with your medical team before changing your own healthcare regimen. Advertisements in inMotion are reviewed according to established criteria and guidelines. We aim to support public awareness of commercially available products – things that might be helpful to you and to avoid advertisements that might deceive or mislead the reader. Acceptance of advertisements in inMotion is not an endorsement by the Amputee Coalition. The Amputee Coalition does not test advertised products, conduct independent scientific reviews of them or ensure their claims. Companies that sell through the mail must comply with federal regulations regarding customer notification if the product is not available within 30 days. The Amputee Coalition reserves the right to reject any advertisement for any reason, which need not be disclosed to the party submitting the advertisement. Opinions expressed in signed articles are those of the authors and are not necessarily endorsed by the Amputee Coalition. Printed in the United States of America. Contact the Amputee Coalition at 888/267-5669 or amputee-coalition.org 3 Accessible Housing & Transportation You Can Get There From Here “Degrees of ability vary, but the basic principle remains the same: The degree of a man’s independence, initiative and personal love for his work determines his talent as a worker and his worth as a man. Independence is the only gauge of human virtue and value. … There is no substitute for personal dignity. There is no standard of personal dignity except independence.” ~ Ayn Rand, The Fountainhead


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