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Contact the Amputee Coalition at 888/267-5669 or amputee-coalition.org 27 non-disabled park visitors. They just loaded one person into a wheelchair and took the whole party to the front of the line. I also have seen teens do the same thing. This new policy eliminates that abuse.” Disney said it changed its pass policy “so it can continue to serve the guests who truly need it. The new program is designed … to help control abuse that was, unfortunately, widespread and growing at an alarming rate.” Candy explains, “One thing you have to realize is that the ‘fast tracking to the front of the line’ for disabled patrons was not implemented to cut the waiting time; but to usher them to the accessible entrance, which was usually the exit. As new rides are built more inclusive there really isn’t the need to use the exit; they can use the same entrance as everyone. I think it reflects inclusion, as everyone stands in the same line, and has the same wait,” she adds. Some of Karen’s tips for making a trip to the amusement park less stressful include: printing a map of the park to figure out the best place to park, researching ride descriptions to decide which ones can accommodate your needs, and printing pictures of the rides to try. If you don’t have access to the Internet to do the research, Karen suggests calling the park’s guest services line at least six weeks in advance to have maps and descriptions mailed. “Most parks are quite specific about ride requirements, and double amputees are not permitted on certain rides because they cannot be buckled in safely,” Karen advises. “The only park that allows double amputees on all rides is Morgan’s Wonderland in San Antonio, Texas, “Most parks are quite specific about ride requirements, and double amputees are not permitted on certain rides because they cannot be buckled in safely.” which is the only 100 percent accessible theme park in the world.” Candy agrees: “Morgan’s Wonderland was built to be inclusive. It’s gate-controlled (reservations are required), so crowds aren’t a problem. The rides all feature roll-on access and there are lots of play areas, water features, a fishing pier and fun games – all of which are completely accessible. Plus, entrance is free if you’re disabled; caregivers are $5. It’s not a thrill park, but it’s a great choice for kids under 12.” Vacationland, USA For a non-thrill ride experience, a visit to the hundreds of local, state and national parks make a great vacation and that specialized information may be easier to ascertain, thanks to a Michigan family. Ron Wilmers is a travel enthusiast. He, his wife, Kay, an RN, and their son, Roger, a professional photographer, turned their passion into purpose when they developed The Disabled Traveler’s Companion (tdtcompanion.com) to help other outdoor lovers and would-be travelers with special needs navigate their trips. Ron says it’s Photography by Robin Jerstad - above two right photos


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