Page 22

Inmotion_Jul_Aug_2014

growing up as an amputee open doors and get a job.” g by Kevin Messner Growing up is a challenge for most kids. Being an amputee makes it harder, but it also offers opportunities that many kids who aren’t amputees don’t get to have. You get looks and people say some mean things, which hurts and can make growing up challenging, but doors open that make growing up wonderful. Elementary school was hard for me. Kids would stare at my leg because they weren’t sure what it was. They were curious. Some said, “Look at that kid with the robot leg.” It made me shy and I tried to cover it up. My shyness pushed others away and it made me feel uncomfortable. Even though I had good grades and nice teachers, I struggled a lot to accept myself and my amputation. Life outside of school was much better. My prosthetists are awesome guys. They always 22 inMotion Volume 24, Issue 4 July | August 2014 “I hope to become a great snowboarder and maybe train for the Paralympics. I can’t wait to drive fix my legs right away and even made me a pirate peg leg once for a Halloween costume and tweaked my bike so I could ride it. At Arizona Disabled Sports, I learned archery, how to swim and, best of all, to run. The Challenged Athletes Foundation bought me my first running leg and I started to compete nationally with other disabled athletes. I travelled with the AZ Heat team to the National Junior Disability Championships and made many friends who also had amputations and other disabilities. At the Endeavor Games, I saw the most amputees I had ever seen in one place and many were Paralympians! I realized that maybe I could be one too, someday. During the summer between sixth and seventh grade, I went to the Paddy Rossbach Youth Camp. It was great to be with all other amputees and I partied and had a blast. From


Inmotion_Jul_Aug_2014
To see the actual publication please follow the link above