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L

by Tom Ki

“There is nomedicine like hope, no incentive so great, andno tonic so powerful as the expectation of something better tomorrow.”

– Orison Swett Marden

Hope.

The hope deep within Jen Lacey’s soul drives her these days, especially since a 9 a.m. phone call from Jamey Fre May 6, 2011. French, the former of development for the Amputee called Lacey at home in Jackson, to tell her she had been accepted To Ability scholar for the Coalitio 2011 conference in Kansas City, “At that moment when Jamey things changed and started falli place for me,” Lacey says. “I kn was going in the right direction In October 2010, she decided a left below-knee amputation a years of agony, during which sh experienced 17 surgeries, strug with depression, infections, cha medications, different doctors a chronic pain. Her surgery was for June 8, less than a week afte conference. She applied for a B scholarship before her amputat was a little unusual, French say Lacey knew the amputation was coming, but wanted to meet other amputees, talk with them and see what their lives are like. “I was being flled with support and energy and fe alive again at the conference,” s “The energy was so positive. Th I met there embrace and live th

the fullest. I knew I was going to be OK.” Lacey’s ordeal began on June 13, 2001. She had fnished her junior year at the University of Maryland. She was driving a friend’s mini-bike near dusk. “I was going to teach my friend’s girlfriend how to ride and change gears, so I headed down the street to warm it up and someone yelled my name,” she recalls. “I looked around and they took my picture. The fash blinded me. I hit a speed bump at the

wrong angle and the bike fipped. I landed by a curb and the bike landed on my left ankle and foot and crushed them. I knew it was bad. I could see bones sticking out.” She was in a hospital for more than 2 weeks. She went home for the summer to recover and was back in school by the fall. On August 8 Lacey had outpatient surgery to remove metal from her leg. They didn’t get it all, and she returned on August 31 for another surgery. That’s when she developed a staph infection. “I was

he incisions broke open. t and went into septic t died. They said I was an my life.” She recovered s in September. “Yep, at fall,” she recalls. With d a wheelchair, she kept duated in December 2003 psychology. mputation when it rtly thereafter? “I was 22 want to hear anything tion, but it was in the back admits. “I was told that it choice for me because the injury was. I chose le life was ahead of me. I ch surgery would help. I pain, but I refused to let pain take over my life. I and cry into my pillow people know. Even with meds, the pain was still out 8 or 9 on the scale.” n those 10 years from the ident to the amputation, y didn’t slow down much. etermined young woman d at Children’s National dical Center in Wash-ngton, D.C., as an intern

24 in Motion Volume 21, Issue 5 Septe

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